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MODIFIABLE RISK FACTORS FOR CORONARY HEART DISEASE: SEDENTARY LIFE-STYLE / LACK OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY
Sedentary life or lack of exercise in our daily life has become the most important reason of heart disease in modern life. With modern technology, help from their wives, drivers, servants, peons, and staff, most of the executives have stopped doing any physical activity. Research studies have shown that low physical activity is often associated with high incidence of coronary heart disease. Regular exercise can break fat, decrease cholesterol, reduce blood sugar, control blood pressure, reduce overweight by consuming stored fat in the body and make the heart more healthy and strong to respond well to unexpected physical activity needs. The absence of the same will have the opposite effect. Without exercise more and more people will be prone to heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity and a low level of fitness. Besides, lack of physical activity may also lead to less flexibility, joint diseases, and so many other ailments.
Think of a typical person in a modern society. His life is literally sedentary. He gets up at 6 a.m., has bed tea, reads newspapers. These two sedentary activities will consume about two hours along with watching television. He will probably talk on the phone for sometime. And followed by a bath and a good breakfast. He goes to the office or shop by car, scooter or public transport, doing very low physical activity. Even if he plans to walk every day, he mostly misses doing it.
In the office, he does a lot of writing, talking and computing – all requiring him to sit on a chair – the whole day. No exercise till now. Late in the evening he comes home in the car or by any other mechanical vehicle. He then sits and watches television, gossips, has a good dinner and goes to sleep.
No exercise at all throughout the day. Heart disease is bound to come one day, may be after 5 years. If one does not exert physically, one must cut down the fat intake or face the consequences.
It is seen daily that labourers, porters, farmers, athletes or people who go to office by cycle hardly have a heart disease. On the other hand, clerks, officers, executives, sedentary businessmen, lawyers, doctors, bankers are more prone to heart disease, because of lack of physical activity.
In the past people did not have these vehicles. They used to exert more – walking to the office, visiting other villages on foot, working in the fields, carrying their luggage themselves, grinding their grains, cleaning the house themselves. So they did not have heart disease as they would break all the fats and meats they were eating. Now things have changed, therefore the heart disease is coming closer.
*16/283/5*

MODIFIABLE RISK FACTORS FOR CORONARY HEART DISEASE: SEDENTARY LIFE-STYLE / LACK OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY Sedentary life or lack of exercise in our daily life has become the most important reason of heart disease in modern life. With modern technology, help from their wives, drivers, servants, peons, and staff, most of the executives have stopped doing any physical activity. Research studies have shown that low physical activity is often associated with high incidence of coronary heart disease. Regular exercise can break fat, decrease cholesterol, reduce blood sugar, control blood pressure, reduce overweight by consuming stored fat in the body and make the heart more healthy and strong to respond well to unexpected physical activity needs. The absence of the same will have the opposite effect. Without exercise more and more people will be prone to heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity and a low level of fitness. Besides, lack of physical activity may also lead to less flexibility, joint diseases, and so many other ailments.Think of a typical person in a modern society. His life is literally sedentary. He gets up at 6 a.m., has bed tea, reads newspapers. These two sedentary activities will consume about two hours along with watching television. He will probably talk on the phone for sometime. And followed by a bath and a good breakfast. He goes to the office or shop by car, scooter or public transport, doing very low physical activity. Even if he plans to walk every day, he mostly misses doing it.In the office, he does a lot of writing, talking and computing – all requiring him to sit on a chair – the whole day. No exercise till now. Late in the evening he comes home in the car or by any other mechanical vehicle. He then sits and watches television, gossips, has a good dinner and goes to sleep.No exercise at all throughout the day. Heart disease is bound to come one day, may be after 5 years. If one does not exert physically, one must cut down the fat intake or face the consequences.It is seen daily that labourers, porters, farmers, athletes or people who go to office by cycle hardly have a heart disease. On the other hand, clerks, officers, executives, sedentary businessmen, lawyers, doctors, bankers are more prone to heart disease, because of lack of physical activity.In the past people did not have these vehicles. They used to exert more – walking to the office, visiting other villages on foot, working in the fields, carrying their luggage themselves, grinding their grains, cleaning the house themselves. So they did not have heart disease as they would break all the fats and meats they were eating. Now things have changed, therefore the heart disease is coming closer.*16/283/5*

CONTROLLING RISKS FOR CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES: MONITOR YOUR CHOLESTEROL LEVELS
If a blood test reveals that you have a high level of total cholesterol (more than 240 mg/dl), the first thing you should do is to have the test retaken to make sure that the reading is accurate. (Remember that prior to having your blood drawn, you must not eat or drink anything for 12 hours.) If your total cholesterol level still high, you should request that a lipoprotein analysis be done to determine the level of LDLs and HDLs in your blood. Lipoprotein analysis, which also requires that you fast for 12 hours, measures the level of three substances: total cholesterol, HDL, and triglycerides. The level of LDL is derived using a standard formula: LDL = Total cholesterol – HDL – (Triglycerides:5). For example, if the level of total cholesterol is 200, the level of HDL 45, and the level of triglycerides 150, the LDL level would be 125 (200 – 45 – 30).
In general, LDL is more closely associated with cardiovascular risks than is total cholesterol. However, most authorities agree that by looking only at LDL, we ignore the positive effects of HDL. Perhaps the best method of evaluating risk is to examine the ratio of HDL to total cholesterol or the percentage of HDL in total cholesterol. If the percentage of HDL is less than 35, the risk increases dramatically.
The ratio of HDL to total cholesterol can be controlled either by lowering LDL levels or by raising HDL levels. The best way to lower LDL levels is to reduce dietary intake of the major sources of saturated fat. However, in extreme cases medications can also be used.
*12/277/5*

CONTROLLING RISKS FOR CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES: MONITOR YOUR CHOLESTEROL LEVELS If a blood test reveals that you have a high level of total cholesterol (more than 240 mg/dl), the first thing you should do is to have the test retaken to make sure that the reading is accurate. (Remember that prior to having your blood drawn, you must not eat or drink anything for 12 hours.) If your total cholesterol level still high, you should request that a lipoprotein analysis be done to determine the level of LDLs and HDLs in your blood. Lipoprotein analysis, which also requires that you fast for 12 hours, measures the level of three substances: total cholesterol, HDL, and triglycerides. The level of LDL is derived using a standard formula: LDL = Total cholesterol – HDL – (Triglycerides:5). For example, if the level of total cholesterol is 200, the level of HDL 45, and the level of triglycerides 150, the LDL level would be 125 (200 – 45 – 30).In general, LDL is more closely associated with cardiovascular risks than is total cholesterol. However, most authorities agree that by looking only at LDL, we ignore the positive effects of HDL. Perhaps the best method of evaluating risk is to examine the ratio of HDL to total cholesterol or the percentage of HDL in total cholesterol. If the percentage of HDL is less than 35, the risk increases dramatically.The ratio of HDL to total cholesterol can be controlled either by lowering LDL levels or by raising HDL levels. The best way to lower LDL levels is to reduce dietary intake of the major sources of saturated fat. However, in extreme cases medications can also be used.*12/277/5*

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