IMMUNE POWER DIET: THE AMINO ACID IQ QUIZ
1. In the last year, how often did you eat to excess?
5   Never
4 Once or twice
3 3 to 5 times
2 At least once a month
1 Weekly or more often
2. How is your memory?
5 It has always been excellent
4 I’m occasionally absent-minded
3 I seem to forget things more than ever, and it’s annoying
2 I definitely feel that my memory is slipping
3. How many times in the last month have you had trouble falling asleep?
5   Not at all
4 Once
3 Four or five times
2 Several times a week
1 More often than not
4. Do you have outbreaks of cold sores, shingles, or herpes?
5 No
4 Sometimes I get cold sores around my mouth
3 I have occasional outbreaks of genital herpes
2 I often have outbreaks of genital herpes and sores on my body
5. Do you have chronic aches and pains?
5 No, never
4 I have in the past, but not lately
3 Occasionally, but they are not serious
2 I frequently am bothered by pain
1 I have chronic pain that often stops me from doing things
6. Do you have trouble controlling your weight?
5 No, I have always weighed the right amount
4 I’m not overweight, but I’m always dieting
3 My weight tends to fluctuate
2 I gain weight very easily
1 No matter what I’ve tried, I can’t lose weight
7. Do you have arthritis?
5 No, never
4 Occasional or mild twinges
3 I have moderate pain, frequently
2 I have severe, chronic pain
8. How well preserved are you?
5 I have always looked younger than my age
4 I look good for my age
3 I look about average for my age
2   I’m showing my age
1   I look older than I should
9. How fast does your hair grow?
5   Very fast
4 Moderately quickly
3 Not as fast as it used to
10. Do you suffer from mood and energy swings?
5 No, never
4 I have in the past, but not now
3 Yes
11. How alert and attentive are you?
5 Very alert with good mental energy and organization
4 Usually alert
3 I catch my mind wandering often
2 I can’t think as clearly as I used to
1 I can’t seem to concentrate well any more
12. Does your job throw your body clock off balance?
5 No, I work days and have regular days off each week
4 Occasionally I work overtime or rotate shifts
3 I travel often and suffer from jet lag
2 My work schedule prevents me from sleeping regularly
*57\242\2*
COMMON COMPLICATIONS OF SPINAL CORD INJURY: LOW BLOOD PRESSURE AND DECUBITUS ULCERS
Low blood pressure
Normal methods of maintaining blood pressure are sometimes damaged by spinal cord injury. Blood pressure may drop suddenly when moving from a lying to a sitting position, especially during the first few weeks after the injury. This phenomenon, called orthostatic hypotension, is what Franklin experienced when he got dizzy the first few times he tried to sit up.
To prevent a substantial drop in blood pressure when sitting up, you may need to wrap your legs or use an elastic belt around your abdomen in order to eliminate pooling of blood. Rising slowly also helps. At first you may feel faint and may even pass out, but this will improve with practice. Often, as in Franklin’s case, the problem is eliminated spontaneously with regular sitting and activity. For those with severe problems sitting up, a tilt table is sometimes useful. Faintness and dizziness on sitting up can recur whenever you’ve had prolonged bed rest.
Decubitus Ulcers
Pressure sores, or decubitus ulcers (also known as bed sores), develop on the skin in areas subjected to prolonged pressure that temporarily decreases the blood flow to that area. The skin can easily recover if the pressure is relieved, but when pressure persists, pain and eventually irreversible damage can result.
Decubitus ulcers are a potential problem in the absence of normal sensation in the skin, because the individual does not feel discomfort after putting pressure on one area for too long. The first approach to preventing decubitus ulcers when you are confined to bed is to change position every two hours, turning onto the side or onto your back. Once you begin sitting up in a chair, regular pressure releases will get pressure off the sensitive areas. These will become part of your daily routine for the rest of your life. The several kinds of pressure releases relieve the pressure of body weight from particular areas of skin.
A common type of pressure release for those who can use their arms is a wheelchair pushup, using both arms to lift your body above the seat for about a minute to relieve pressure on the buttocks. If you cannot use your arms, pressure can be relieved by using an electric wheelchair that automatically tilts back your upper body and thus shifts your weight. To prevent decubitus ulcers from forming while you sleep, you may need to change position every few hours. This may require assistance from another person.
*15/156/5*

COMMON COMPLICATIONS OF SPINAL CORD INJURY: LOW BLOOD PRESSURE AND DECUBITUS ULCERS
Low blood pressureNormal methods of maintaining blood pressure are sometimes damaged by spinal cord injury. Blood pressure may drop suddenly when moving from a lying to a sitting position, especially during the first few weeks after the injury. This phenomenon, called orthostatic hypotension, is what Franklin experienced when he got dizzy the first few times he tried to sit up.To prevent a substantial drop in blood pressure when sitting up, you may need to wrap your legs or use an elastic belt around your abdomen in order to eliminate pooling of blood. Rising slowly also helps. At first you may feel faint and may even pass out, but this will improve with practice. Often, as in Franklin’s case, the problem is eliminated spontaneously with regular sitting and activity. For those with severe problems sitting up, a tilt table is sometimes useful. Faintness and dizziness on sitting up can recur whenever you’ve had prolonged bed rest.
Decubitus UlcersPressure sores, or decubitus ulcers (also known as bed sores), develop on the skin in areas subjected to prolonged pressure that temporarily decreases the blood flow to that area. The skin can easily recover if the pressure is relieved, but when pressure persists, pain and eventually irreversible damage can result.Decubitus ulcers are a potential problem in the absence of normal sensation in the skin, because the individual does not feel discomfort after putting pressure on one area for too long. The first approach to preventing decubitus ulcers when you are confined to bed is to change position every two hours, turning onto the side or onto your back. Once you begin sitting up in a chair, regular pressure releases will get pressure off the sensitive areas. These will become part of your daily routine for the rest of your life. The several kinds of pressure releases relieve the pressure of body weight from particular areas of skin.A common type of pressure release for those who can use their arms is a wheelchair pushup, using both arms to lift your body above the seat for about a minute to relieve pressure on the buttocks. If you cannot use your arms, pressure can be relieved by using an electric wheelchair that automatically tilts back your upper body and thus shifts your weight. To prevent decubitus ulcers from forming while you sleep, you may need to change position every few hours. This may require assistance from another person.
*15/156/5*

THE CANDIDA-ASTHMA CONNECTION: TRIALLING DIETS
Over the past twenty years we have experimented with over one hundred different diets. There is no question that if an individual is on a poor diet and lives on junk foods and take aways, almost any diet will be an improvement and therefore the person will be healthier and probably feel better. But that is not the same as saying that this or that diet ‘cures’ Candida, asthma or an allergy. Some, like the ‘metabolism-balancing diet’ (also known as the ‘bio-balancing diet’, are inappropriate for many people. Others will be useful for some people but not for others. Unfortunately diets have to be tailored for the individual. If someone is unusually sensitive to nightshades, then tomatoes and potatoes may have to be excluded. Others will need to avoid foods containing natural salicylates and many, if not all, asthmatics tend to do better on a regime free of milk and sulphites. Many digestive problems are related to a gluten intolerance and gluten free diets can help to treat asthma and Candida by lowering the total load.
Can Diet Alone Cure Candida?
In some cases this may be possible. In the vast majority of people, however, Candida invasion can only be stopped if the focus of infection, the gut, is treated. And that almost invariably requires some form of anti-fungal medication. Your doctor should be able to advise you after judging the severity of your condition by interpreting the results of some of the many available laboratory tests. Sometimes people believe they have been cured because some or most of the symptoms disappear after they have followed an elimination or anti-candida diet for a while. When the appropriate tests are carried out, however, Candida is found to linger on inside cells. By testing antibody responses, we can judge whether the organism represents a threat to the patient and whether the body can defend itself. The symptoms of patients who respond well to diet alone may have gone simply because they did not have Candida in the first place, but were very allergic to some of the foods they stopped eating while on the Candida diet!
There is no question that a trial elimination diet is a useful diagnostic procedure. Eliminating moulds, fungi, ferments and nutrients which contribute to Candida growth, such as sugars and refined carbohydrates, should improve the patient’s condition. If it does not, then either the Candida problem is more than just superficial and will need more vigorous treatment, or there are other reasons for the symptoms. If the diet is successful in eliminating the problems or at least making you feel a lot better, then you have achieved good results. Unfortunately though, you still don’t know if Candida was the problem or you were simply allergic to one of the foods avoided.
*61\145\2*

THE CANDIDA-ASTHMA CONNECTION: TRIALLING DIETSOver the past twenty years we have experimented with over one hundred different diets. There is no question that if an individual is on a poor diet and lives on junk foods and take aways, almost any diet will be an improvement and therefore the person will be healthier and probably feel better. But that is not the same as saying that this or that diet ‘cures’ Candida, asthma or an allergy. Some, like the ‘metabolism-balancing diet’ (also known as the ‘bio-balancing diet’, are inappropriate for many people. Others will be useful for some people but not for others. Unfortunately diets have to be tailored for the individual. If someone is unusually sensitive to nightshades, then tomatoes and potatoes may have to be excluded. Others will need to avoid foods containing natural salicylates and many, if not all, asthmatics tend to do better on a regime free of milk and sulphites. Many digestive problems are related to a gluten intolerance and gluten free diets can help to treat asthma and Candida by lowering the total load.Can Diet Alone Cure Candida?In some cases this may be possible. In the vast majority of people, however, Candida invasion can only be stopped if the focus of infection, the gut, is treated. And that almost invariably requires some form of anti-fungal medication. Your doctor should be able to advise you after judging the severity of your condition by interpreting the results of some of the many available laboratory tests. Sometimes people believe they have been cured because some or most of the symptoms disappear after they have followed an elimination or anti-candida diet for a while. When the appropriate tests are carried out, however, Candida is found to linger on inside cells. By testing antibody responses, we can judge whether the organism represents a threat to the patient and whether the body can defend itself. The symptoms of patients who respond well to diet alone may have gone simply because they did not have Candida in the first place, but were very allergic to some of the foods they stopped eating while on the Candida diet!There is no question that a trial elimination diet is a useful diagnostic procedure. Eliminating moulds, fungi, ferments and nutrients which contribute to Candida growth, such as sugars and refined carbohydrates, should improve the patient’s condition. If it does not, then either the Candida problem is more than just superficial and will need more vigorous treatment, or there are other reasons for the symptoms. If the diet is successful in eliminating the problems or at least making you feel a lot better, then you have achieved good results. Unfortunately though, you still don’t know if Candida was the problem or you were simply allergic to one of the foods avoided.*61\145\2*

DIABETES: TAKING ORAL HYPOGLYCEMIC DRUGS
If you are taking oral hypoglycemic pills and your blood or urine glucose levels become very high, consider increasing your dose. Naturally, whether you can do this, depends on whether you are already on the maximum dose or not. If you are not on the maximum dose, try taking another half pill a day or another whole pill if this does not take you over the maximum.
One of the problems of being on pills is that they may not be absorbed if you have diarrhea or vomiting. Even if they are, they may not be sufficient to overcome the increased insulin resistance that can result from infection and other illnesses. If you have diarrhea and vomiting or if you cannot bring your blood glucose level down yourself, or if you feel very ill, contact your doctor immediately. Sometimes it may be necessary to have insulin injections to control your blood glucose level during a time of illness. This does not necessarily mean that the insulin will need to be continued when you have recovered.
Loss of glucose control on oral hypoglycemics
Many people with the form of diabetes that starts during middle age and the later years (maturity onset type) can control their blood glucose on diet and oral hypoglycemic treatment. Most people whose diabetes begins under the age of thirty years need insulin treatment but a few with maturity onset diabetes of youth (MODY) can be treated successfully with oral agents.
Control of your weight through diet is especially important in maturity onset diabetes because obesity increases the body’s resistance to the action of insulin. However, if insulin production fails, whether in maturity onset diabetes or MODY, insulin injections will be needed for glucose control. This is not a disaster.
Geoffrey, who is now fifty-eight years old and a production manager, had been taking chlorpropamide since his diabetes was diagnosed five years previously, gradually, increasing the dose to the maximum of 500 mg daily.
Despite sticking carefully to his diet and remaining at the ideal weight for his age and height, his glucose levels began to rise. His doctor added metformin treatment and the dose of this was increased to its maximum, but to no avail. Geoffrey’s blood glucose levels continued to rise and he began to feel thirsty and had to get up to urinate several times each night. He felt tired and listless. I told him that he now needed insulin treatment but Geoffrey had a horror of injections and was convinced that he would never be able either to give his own insulin or allow anyone else to give it to him.
‘I would sooner die than go on to insulin,’ he said.
Nothing I said could persuade him to change his mind. Over the succeeding weeks he became increasingly ill, was drinking large quantities of fluids daily, started to lose weight and was irritable with his wife and family. He developed an embarrassing soreness around his penis, a fungal condition called thrush, which men and women with diabetes can develop with poor glucose control. This was treated but it recurred. At each clinic visit I tried to persuade Geoffrey to change his mind about insulin treatment but he remained adamant. Then finally one day he came into the clinic in tears. He could no longer do his job properly, he felt awful and was badly depressed. His wife, who came with him, was very worried about him. I got out an insulin syringe and needle and demonstrated on myself how simple it is to insert the needle under the skin. After thirty minutes’ persuasion by me and his wife, Geoffrey stuck the needle into his arm.
‘It doesn’t hurt,’ he said, astonished.
He is now on twice daily insulin injections with good glucose control, is back at work and says he feels marvelous. He wishes he had tried insulin sooner.
Call for help
Even the best informed and most efficient people have occasional Problems. It is not an admission of defeat to call for help -just common sense. Doctors greatly prefer being called when they can help prevent a problem from getting worse than when a disaster has occurred. Contact your doctor sooner rather than later.
Problems with glucose control
•   Hypoglycemia is preventable. Learn your warning signs – and learn from your mistakes.
•   Measure blood glucose levels frequently when you are ill.
•   Plan what to do if you become ill before it happens.
•   Take more insulin if your blood glucose level rises.
•   Check for ketones if your blood glucose level rises or you cannot eat.
•   Never stop taking your insulin.
•   Do not be afraid to call for help.
*29/102/5*

DIABETES: TAKING ORAL HYPOGLYCEMIC DRUGS
If you are taking oral hypoglycemic pills and your blood or urine glucose levels become very high, consider increasing your dose. Naturally, whether you can do this, depends on whether you are already on the maximum dose or not. If you are not on the maximum dose, try taking another half pill a day or another whole pill if this does not take you over the maximum.One of the problems of being on pills is that they may not be absorbed if you have diarrhea or vomiting. Even if they are, they may not be sufficient to overcome the increased insulin resistance that can result from infection and other illnesses. If you have diarrhea and vomiting or if you cannot bring your blood glucose level down yourself, or if you feel very ill, contact your doctor immediately. Sometimes it may be necessary to have insulin injections to control your blood glucose level during a time of illness. This does not necessarily mean that the insulin will need to be continued when you have recovered.
Loss of glucose control on oral hypoglycemicsMany people with the form of diabetes that starts during middle age and the later years (maturity onset type) can control their blood glucose on diet and oral hypoglycemic treatment. Most people whose diabetes begins under the age of thirty years need insulin treatment but a few with maturity onset diabetes of youth (MODY) can be treated successfully with oral agents.Control of your weight through diet is especially important in maturity onset diabetes because obesity increases the body’s resistance to the action of insulin. However, if insulin production fails, whether in maturity onset diabetes or MODY, insulin injections will be needed for glucose control. This is not a disaster.Geoffrey, who is now fifty-eight years old and a production manager, had been taking chlorpropamide since his diabetes was diagnosed five years previously, gradually, increasing the dose to the maximum of 500 mg daily.    Despite sticking carefully to his diet and remaining at the ideal weight for his age and height, his glucose levels began to rise. His doctor added metformin treatment and the dose of this was increased to its maximum, but to no avail. Geoffrey’s blood glucose levels continued to rise and he began to feel thirsty and had to get up to urinate several times each night. He felt tired and listless. I told him that he now needed insulin treatment but Geoffrey had a horror of injections and was convinced that he would never be able either to give his own insulin or allow anyone else to give it to him.’I would sooner die than go on to insulin,’ he said.Nothing I said could persuade him to change his mind. Over the succeeding weeks he became increasingly ill, was drinking large quantities of fluids daily, started to lose weight and was irritable with his wife and family. He developed an embarrassing soreness around his penis, a fungal condition called thrush, which men and women with diabetes can develop with poor glucose control. This was treated but it recurred. At each clinic visit I tried to persuade Geoffrey to change his mind about insulin treatment but he remained adamant. Then finally one day he came into the clinic in tears. He could no longer do his job properly, he felt awful and was badly depressed. His wife, who came with him, was very worried about him. I got out an insulin syringe and needle and demonstrated on myself how simple it is to insert the needle under the skin. After thirty minutes’ persuasion by me and his wife, Geoffrey stuck the needle into his arm.’It doesn’t hurt,’ he said, astonished.He is now on twice daily insulin injections with good glucose control, is back at work and says he feels marvelous. He wishes he had tried insulin sooner.
Call for helpEven the best informed and most efficient people have occasional Problems. It is not an admission of defeat to call for help -just common sense. Doctors greatly prefer being called when they can help prevent a problem from getting worse than when a disaster has occurred. Contact your doctor sooner rather than later.
Problems with glucose control•   Hypoglycemia is preventable. Learn your warning signs – and learn from your mistakes.•   Measure blood glucose levels frequently when you are ill.•   Plan what to do if you become ill before it happens.•   Take more insulin if your blood glucose level rises.•   Check for ketones if your blood glucose level rises or you cannot eat.•   Never stop taking your insulin.•   Do not be afraid to call for help.
*29/102/5*

MODIFIABLE RISK FACTORS FOR CORONARY HEART DISEASE: SEDENTARY LIFE-STYLE / LACK OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY
Sedentary life or lack of exercise in our daily life has become the most important reason of heart disease in modern life. With modern technology, help from their wives, drivers, servants, peons, and staff, most of the executives have stopped doing any physical activity. Research studies have shown that low physical activity is often associated with high incidence of coronary heart disease. Regular exercise can break fat, decrease cholesterol, reduce blood sugar, control blood pressure, reduce overweight by consuming stored fat in the body and make the heart more healthy and strong to respond well to unexpected physical activity needs. The absence of the same will have the opposite effect. Without exercise more and more people will be prone to heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity and a low level of fitness. Besides, lack of physical activity may also lead to less flexibility, joint diseases, and so many other ailments.
Think of a typical person in a modern society. His life is literally sedentary. He gets up at 6 a.m., has bed tea, reads newspapers. These two sedentary activities will consume about two hours along with watching television. He will probably talk on the phone for sometime. And followed by a bath and a good breakfast. He goes to the office or shop by car, scooter or public transport, doing very low physical activity. Even if he plans to walk every day, he mostly misses doing it.
In the office, he does a lot of writing, talking and computing – all requiring him to sit on a chair – the whole day. No exercise till now. Late in the evening he comes home in the car or by any other mechanical vehicle. He then sits and watches television, gossips, has a good dinner and goes to sleep.
No exercise at all throughout the day. Heart disease is bound to come one day, may be after 5 years. If one does not exert physically, one must cut down the fat intake or face the consequences.
It is seen daily that labourers, porters, farmers, athletes or people who go to office by cycle hardly have a heart disease. On the other hand, clerks, officers, executives, sedentary businessmen, lawyers, doctors, bankers are more prone to heart disease, because of lack of physical activity.
In the past people did not have these vehicles. They used to exert more – walking to the office, visiting other villages on foot, working in the fields, carrying their luggage themselves, grinding their grains, cleaning the house themselves. So they did not have heart disease as they would break all the fats and meats they were eating. Now things have changed, therefore the heart disease is coming closer.
*16/283/5*

MODIFIABLE RISK FACTORS FOR CORONARY HEART DISEASE: SEDENTARY LIFE-STYLE / LACK OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY Sedentary life or lack of exercise in our daily life has become the most important reason of heart disease in modern life. With modern technology, help from their wives, drivers, servants, peons, and staff, most of the executives have stopped doing any physical activity. Research studies have shown that low physical activity is often associated with high incidence of coronary heart disease. Regular exercise can break fat, decrease cholesterol, reduce blood sugar, control blood pressure, reduce overweight by consuming stored fat in the body and make the heart more healthy and strong to respond well to unexpected physical activity needs. The absence of the same will have the opposite effect. Without exercise more and more people will be prone to heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity and a low level of fitness. Besides, lack of physical activity may also lead to less flexibility, joint diseases, and so many other ailments.Think of a typical person in a modern society. His life is literally sedentary. He gets up at 6 a.m., has bed tea, reads newspapers. These two sedentary activities will consume about two hours along with watching television. He will probably talk on the phone for sometime. And followed by a bath and a good breakfast. He goes to the office or shop by car, scooter or public transport, doing very low physical activity. Even if he plans to walk every day, he mostly misses doing it.In the office, he does a lot of writing, talking and computing – all requiring him to sit on a chair – the whole day. No exercise till now. Late in the evening he comes home in the car or by any other mechanical vehicle. He then sits and watches television, gossips, has a good dinner and goes to sleep.No exercise at all throughout the day. Heart disease is bound to come one day, may be after 5 years. If one does not exert physically, one must cut down the fat intake or face the consequences.It is seen daily that labourers, porters, farmers, athletes or people who go to office by cycle hardly have a heart disease. On the other hand, clerks, officers, executives, sedentary businessmen, lawyers, doctors, bankers are more prone to heart disease, because of lack of physical activity.In the past people did not have these vehicles. They used to exert more – walking to the office, visiting other villages on foot, working in the fields, carrying their luggage themselves, grinding their grains, cleaning the house themselves. So they did not have heart disease as they would break all the fats and meats they were eating. Now things have changed, therefore the heart disease is coming closer.*16/283/5*

GYNECOLOGICAL CANCER AND TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE
Traditional Chinese medicine has a variety of practices including acupuncture, herbal medicine, traditional dietary therapy, and Chinese massage and moxibustion. They are all based on the philosophy that the human body functions as a whole and as part of nature. Disease occurs when the harmony between bodily functions and the environment is disrupted.
The use of complementary therapies by women with gynecological cancers is widespread. Motivations for the use of complementary therapies vary. Women see complementary therapies as providing psychological support, and believe that they are useful for strengthening the immune system and thus helping to stop the progress of the disease and also preventing recurrence.
There are also issues of self-empowerment, personal growth and communication. Patients perceive these issues as being more part of the complementary therapists’ view of treatment, rather than a conventional medical approach. Part of their decision to use these therapies is based on the need to take control of the management of their cancer treatment and overall well-being.
Did you know…
•     That 2 out of 3 women with gynecological cancer use some form of complementary therapy during the course of their treatment?
•     Younger and better-educated women seem to use complementary therapies more than older women do?
*98/144/5*

GYNECOLOGICAL CANCER AND TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINETraditional Chinese medicine has a variety of practices including acupuncture, herbal medicine, traditional dietary therapy, and Chinese massage and moxibustion. They are all based on the philosophy that the human body functions as a whole and as part of nature. Disease occurs when the harmony between bodily functions and the environment is disrupted.The use of complementary therapies by women with gynecological cancers is widespread. Motivations for the use of complementary therapies vary. Women see complementary therapies as providing psychological support, and believe that they are useful for strengthening the immune system and thus helping to stop the progress of the disease and also preventing recurrence.There are also issues of self-empowerment, personal growth and communication. Patients perceive these issues as being more part of the complementary therapists’ view of treatment, rather than a conventional medical approach. Part of their decision to use these therapies is based on the need to take control of the management of their cancer treatment and overall well-being.
Did you know…•     That 2 out of 3 women with gynecological cancer use some form of complementary therapy during the course of their treatment?•     Younger and better-educated women seem to use complementary therapies more than older women do?*98/144/5*

HOW CONSTIPATION AFFECTS ARTHRITICS: BREAKFAST, LUNCH. DINNER
The Breakfast to Aid Regularity
Most constipated arthritics too often think of breakfast in terms of “bacon, eggs, toast, and coffee.” Bacon and eggs do not add any stimulative effect to the colon. Toast and coffee contribute a mere trickle.
Many people swear by coffee as a laxative. Taken by itself, it may prove of some help. But drink it ten to thirty minutes before a meal or at least three hours after eating.
In this book, we have set up a better type of breakfast for arthritics. Consisting of buttered whole-wheat toast, eggs, and a glass of room-temperature milk, eaten in that order. This gives the stomach the potential semi-solid mass. The whole-wheat toast contributes the stimulating factor. A few leaves of green lettuce, with the morning meal, contain enough fibre to incite some more intestinal action.
Lettuce is optional, of course. It may sound strange as a breakfast food, but it does contain the right ingredients. Since no one wants diarrhoea or three bowel movements a day, we do not need any vegetable in the morning stronger than lettuce.
The fire—the burning of food—is now started. If you must drink anything between breakfast and lunch, make sure it is at least three hours after the first meal. And keep the liquid at room temperature or warm.
Lunch with the Right Ingredients
Lunch should also contain a stimulating factor which will aid the contraction and relaxation of the digestive tract muscles.
A lunch consisting of a grilled cheese sandwich should include a raw fruit or vegetable—so that the residue from the second meal will keep the mass moving. Celery, cucumber, or any laxative type vegetable is recommended. A portion of stewed prunes or raw, unsulphured (black) figs is gently laxative.
Afternoon Break
It is a long stretch between noon and six or “seven o’clock when the third and often largest meal of the day is served. No one is expected to go without some liquid or solid food during this long interval. But try to avoid eating if you can, especially if you are unduly constipated and your body needs oils.
If necessary, drink water at room temperature. Providing it is at least three hours after lunch, or at least ten minutes before dinner. Especially avoid iced water after a meal, or you will congeal the oils still in the stomach and digestive tract . . . you will smother the food-burning fire which you set going at meal-time.
Any mid-afternoon snack or sandwich should contain a little butter or lettuce. Butter serves as a lubricant, and lettuce as a stimulant to food already ingested. Mayonnaise should not replace butter, because it will yield energy, not lubricants.
Dinner for Health and Enjoyment
At dinner time still remember the stimulating factor. Follow the dictates of taste and the needs of the bowel. The soup is beneficial, with its oils. The steak is delicious, and it can be improved by adding garlic. Garlic has a kick of its own, a stimulation for sluggishness.
For complete dinner menus. The meals were designed to aid arthritics, and the list of foods was made keeping constipation in mind.
*45\146\2*

HOW CONSTIPATION AFFECTS ARTHRITICS: BREAKFAST, LUNCH. DINNERThe Breakfast to Aid RegularityMost constipated arthritics too often think of breakfast in terms of “bacon, eggs, toast, and coffee.” Bacon and eggs do not add any stimulative effect to the colon. Toast and coffee contribute a mere trickle.Many people swear by coffee as a laxative. Taken by itself, it may prove of some help. But drink it ten to thirty minutes before a meal or at least three hours after eating.In this book, we have set up a better type of breakfast for arthritics. Consisting of buttered whole-wheat toast, eggs, and a glass of room-temperature milk, eaten in that order. This gives the stomach the potential semi-solid mass. The whole-wheat toast contributes the stimulating factor. A few leaves of green lettuce, with the morning meal, contain enough fibre to incite some more intestinal action.Lettuce is optional, of course. It may sound strange as a breakfast food, but it does contain the right ingredients. Since no one wants diarrhoea or three bowel movements a day, we do not need any vegetable in the morning stronger than lettuce.The fire—the burning of food—is now started. If you must drink anything between breakfast and lunch, make sure it is at least three hours after the first meal. And keep the liquid at room temperature or warm.Lunch with the Right IngredientsLunch should also contain a stimulating factor which will aid the contraction and relaxation of the digestive tract muscles.A lunch consisting of a grilled cheese sandwich should include a raw fruit or vegetable—so that the residue from the second meal will keep the mass moving. Celery, cucumber, or any laxative type vegetable is recommended. A portion of stewed prunes or raw, unsulphured (black) figs is gently laxative.Afternoon BreakIt is a long stretch between noon and six or “seven o’clock when the third and often largest meal of the day is served. No one is expected to go without some liquid or solid food during this long interval. But try to avoid eating if you can, especially if you are unduly constipated and your body needs oils.If necessary, drink water at room temperature. Providing it is at least three hours after lunch, or at least ten minutes before dinner. Especially avoid iced water after a meal, or you will congeal the oils still in the stomach and digestive tract . . . you will smother the food-burning fire which you set going at meal-time.Any mid-afternoon snack or sandwich should contain a little butter or lettuce. Butter serves as a lubricant, and lettuce as a stimulant to food already ingested. Mayonnaise should not replace butter, because it will yield energy, not lubricants.Dinner for Health and EnjoymentAt dinner time still remember the stimulating factor. Follow the dictates of taste and the needs of the bowel. The soup is beneficial, with its oils. The steak is delicious, and it can be improved by adding garlic. Garlic has a kick of its own, a stimulation for sluggishness.For complete dinner menus. The meals were designed to aid arthritics, and the list of foods was made keeping constipation in mind.*45\146\2*

OCD IN THE FAMILY: THE BURDEN SHOULDERED BY PARENTS
bringing up a child with more-than-mild OCD is always an imposing task. Parents become frustrated that their child cannot be reasoned out of rituals and angry when he or she will not stop them. They blame themselves for their child’s symptoms, assuming they are somehow responsible. They often dread that their child may be developing some sort of a psychotic disorder.
The burden is partly lifted when parents find good professional help. They come to realize that OCD is a biological disorder, limited in its severity, and that they are not responsible for it. Further, they are provided much-needed structure for dealing with the disorder at home. But parents never get completely off the hook. Behavior therapy presents its own dilemmas, such as deciding when a child is showing attention-seeking behavior and deciding when to enforce behavioral limits. Furthermore, obsessions and compulsions make children moody and irritable. On top of that, because OCD children are unusually bright, loving, and dependent, patents tend to identify closely with them and to suffer their setbacks with great anguish.
In a survey of OCD parents conducted in 1993, the Obsessive-Compulsive Foundation found that more than 80 percent reported significant disruption of family life, particularly the loss of normal closeness in family relationships. Major problems identified in OCD sufferers were depression, lack of motivation, and inconsiderate behavior. Major problems for family members were excessive arguing and being drawn into rituals. Parents’ greatest concerns were the future well-being of the OCDer and how they themselves could get back to enjoying life normally.
Parents of OCDers must, indeed, strive to lead a normal life— this is crucial for both parents and the affected child. In order to do this, it is necessary to maintain a rational view of OCD and to avoid becoming overly involved in a child’s symptoms. The OC Foundation has several pamphlets that can be helpful, including, “Learning to Live with OCD,” by Barbara Van Noppen, “Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder in Children and Adolescents,” by Hugh Johnson, and “A Survival Guide for Family,” published by Obsessive Compulsives Anonymous. This last suggests that parents keep reminding themselves, “We didn’t cause our child’s OCD, and we can’t cure our child’s OCD.”
*41/338/2*

OCD IN THE FAMILY: THE BURDEN SHOULDERED BY PARENTSbringing up a child with more-than-mild OCD is always an imposing task. Parents become frustrated that their child cannot be reasoned out of rituals and angry when he or she will not stop them. They blame themselves for their child’s symptoms, assuming they are somehow responsible. They often dread that their child may be developing some sort of a psychotic disorder.The burden is partly lifted when parents find good professional help. They come to realize that OCD is a biological disorder, limited in its severity, and that they are not responsible for it. Further, they are provided much-needed structure for dealing with the disorder at home. But parents never get completely off the hook. Behavior therapy presents its own dilemmas, such as deciding when a child is showing attention-seeking behavior and deciding when to enforce behavioral limits. Furthermore, obsessions and compulsions make children moody and irritable. On top of that, because OCD children are unusually bright, loving, and dependent, patents tend to identify closely with them and to suffer their setbacks with great anguish.In a survey of OCD parents conducted in 1993, the Obsessive-Compulsive Foundation found that more than 80 percent reported significant disruption of family life, particularly the loss of normal closeness in family relationships. Major problems identified in OCD sufferers were depression, lack of motivation, and inconsiderate behavior. Major problems for family members were excessive arguing and being drawn into rituals. Parents’ greatest concerns were the future well-being of the OCDer and how they themselves could get back to enjoying life normally.Parents of OCDers must, indeed, strive to lead a normal life— this is crucial for both parents and the affected child. In order to do this, it is necessary to maintain a rational view of OCD and to avoid becoming overly involved in a child’s symptoms. The OC Foundation has several pamphlets that can be helpful, including, “Learning to Live with OCD,” by Barbara Van Noppen, “Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder in Children and Adolescents,” by Hugh Johnson, and “A Survival Guide for Family,” published by Obsessive Compulsives Anonymous. This last suggests that parents keep reminding themselves, “We didn’t cause our child’s OCD, and we can’t cure our child’s OCD.”*41/338/2*

ALCOHOLISM TREATMENT TECHNIQUES AND APPROACHES: WORKING WITH FAMILIES OF ACTIVE ALCOHOLICS
The most important thing the counselor needs to keep in mind is that the client being treated is the person in the office. In this case it is the family. The big temptation for the counselor may be to try treating the alcoholic in absentia, through the family member. This may be the family member’s wish, too, but it would be futile to attempt it.
What does the family need? One important need is for education about alcoholism, the disease, including its impact on the family. Another is aid in sorting out their own behavior to see how it fits into, or even perpetuates the drinking. Also, they need to sort out their feelings, and realistically come to grips with the true dimensions of the problem and the toll being exacted from them. As well, there is the need to examine what their options are for dealing with the problem. Most importantly family members require support to live their own lives despite the alcoholic. Paradoxically, by doing this, the actual chances of short-circuiting the alcoholism are enhanced.
Family assessment Just as all alcoholics do not display the identical symptoms or have the same degree of chronicity and extent of impairment, the same is true of family members. In the assessment process many of the same questions the counselor asks in dealing with the alcoholic should be considered. What has Caused the family member to seek help now? What is the family’s understanding of the problem? What supports do they have? What is the economic, social, and family situation like? What coping devices do they use? What are their fears? What do they want from you? Where the counselor goes in working with the family will depend on the answers to these questions. Treatment plans for family members might include individual counseling, support groups, Al-Anon, or other agencies.
You will notice that we have been speaking interchangeably about families and family members. Contact with a counselor is typically made by a single individual. Efforts to include other nonalcoholic members of the family (or the alcoholic) usually fall to the counselor. In some cases all it takes is the suggestion. In other cases, the family member may resist. This resistance may be due to a sense of isolation, that no one else in the family cares. It may instead be fear of the other family members’ disapproval for having “spilled the beans” about the family’s secret. Although the ideal might be having the family member approach the others, as the counselor, you (with the client’s permission) can contact other family members to ask them to come in for at least one session. Almost universally others will come in at least once (and this includes the alcoholic), if you tell them you are interested in their views of what is happening.
Family intervention. The initial focus has to be working with the family or family members on their own problems. Nonetheless, the indisputable fact is that the alcoholism is a central problem and that the family would like to see the alcoholic receive help. It is important to recognize that, ineffective as their efforts may have been, still much of a family’s energy has gone into “helping.” Now, as a result of education about the disease, plus assistance in sorting out their own situation, they in essence have become equipped to act more effectively in relation to the alcoholic. At the very least the family has been helped to abandon its protective, manipulative, enabling behavior. However, more is possible. A very successful technique, developed by the Johnson Institute in Minneapolis, consists of an intervention that involves the family and can be used to help move the alcoholic into treatment. This intervention technique and the rationale underpinning it was first described in I’ll Quit Tomorrow.
The intervention process involves a meeting of family, other concerned persons, and the alcoholic, conducted under the direction of a counselor. Each individual, in turn, provides the alcoholic with a list of specific incidents related to drinking that have caused concern. These facts must be conveyed in an atmosphere of genuine concern for the alcoholic. In so doing, the alcoholic is helped to see both the true nature of the problem and the need to seek assistance. Each person also expresses the hope that the alcoholic will seek treatment. By cutting through the denial, by providing the painful details, the intervention process can be thought of as precipitating a crisis for the alcoholic.
The counselor who is involved in family work is well advised to become skilled in conducting interventions, either by attending workshops or by “apprenticing” to someone trained in this technique. We should be clear that conducting an intervention is not something you do on the spur of the moment. It is not something to be done impromptu, just because you happen to have the family together. Nor is it something you describe to the family and suggest they do on their own after supper some evening!
The effectiveness of intervention depends on the participants’ ability to voice a genuine concern and describe incidents that have caused concern in an objective, straightforward manner. This takes briefing and preparatory work. Typically, this will entail several meetings with the family. The family members must become knowledgeable about the disease of alcoholism, so that the behaviors that previously were seen as designed to “get them” can be seen for what they are, symptoms. The preparation will usually involve a rehearsal during which each of the participants goes through the things that they would like to convey to the alcoholic. The participants also need to discuss what treatment options are to be presented, and the actions they will take if the alcoholic does not seek help. Is the spouse ready to ask for a separation? Is the grown daughter ready to say she will not be comfortable allowing Mom to babysit for the grandchildren anymore. Beyond preparing the participants, a successful intervention also requires that the counselor be supportive to all present, equally, and deflect the alcoholic’s anxiety and fears, which may surface as anger.
*128\331\2*

ALCOHOLISM TREATMENT TECHNIQUES AND APPROACHES: WORKING WITH FAMILIES OF ACTIVE ALCOHOLICSThe most important thing the counselor needs to keep in mind is that the client being treated is the person in the office. In this case it is the family. The big temptation for the counselor may be to try treating the alcoholic in absentia, through the family member. This may be the family member’s wish, too, but it would be futile to attempt it.What does the family need? One important need is for education about alcoholism, the disease, including its impact on the family. Another is aid in sorting out their own behavior to see how it fits into, or even perpetuates the drinking. Also, they need to sort out their feelings, and realistically come to grips with the true dimensions of the problem and the toll being exacted from them. As well, there is the need to examine what their options are for dealing with the problem. Most importantly family members require support to live their own lives despite the alcoholic. Paradoxically, by doing this, the actual chances of short-circuiting the alcoholism are enhanced.Family assessment Just as all alcoholics do not display the identical symptoms or have the same degree of chronicity and extent of impairment, the same is true of family members. In the assessment process many of the same questions the counselor asks in dealing with the alcoholic should be considered. What has Caused the family member to seek help now? What is the family’s understanding of the problem? What supports do they have? What is the economic, social, and family situation like? What coping devices do they use? What are their fears? What do they want from you? Where the counselor goes in working with the family will depend on the answers to these questions. Treatment plans for family members might include individual counseling, support groups, Al-Anon, or other agencies.You will notice that we have been speaking interchangeably about families and family members. Contact with a counselor is typically made by a single individual. Efforts to include other nonalcoholic members of the family (or the alcoholic) usually fall to the counselor. In some cases all it takes is the suggestion. In other cases, the family member may resist. This resistance may be due to a sense of isolation, that no one else in the family cares. It may instead be fear of the other family members’ disapproval for having “spilled the beans” about the family’s secret. Although the ideal might be having the family member approach the others, as the counselor, you (with the client’s permission) can contact other family members to ask them to come in for at least one session. Almost universally others will come in at least once (and this includes the alcoholic), if you tell them you are interested in their views of what is happening.Family intervention. The initial focus has to be working with the family or family members on their own problems. Nonetheless, the indisputable fact is that the alcoholism is a central problem and that the family would like to see the alcoholic receive help. It is important to recognize that, ineffective as their efforts may have been, still much of a family’s energy has gone into “helping.” Now, as a result of education about the disease, plus assistance in sorting out their own situation, they in essence have become equipped to act more effectively in relation to the alcoholic. At the very least the family has been helped to abandon its protective, manipulative, enabling behavior. However, more is possible. A very successful technique, developed by the Johnson Institute in Minneapolis, consists of an intervention that involves the family and can be used to help move the alcoholic into treatment. This intervention technique and the rationale underpinning it was first described in I’ll Quit Tomorrow.The intervention process involves a meeting of family, other concerned persons, and the alcoholic, conducted under the direction of a counselor. Each individual, in turn, provides the alcoholic with a list of specific incidents related to drinking that have caused concern. These facts must be conveyed in an atmosphere of genuine concern for the alcoholic. In so doing, the alcoholic is helped to see both the true nature of the problem and the need to seek assistance. Each person also expresses the hope that the alcoholic will seek treatment. By cutting through the denial, by providing the painful details, the intervention process can be thought of as precipitating a crisis for the alcoholic.The counselor who is involved in family work is well advised to become skilled in conducting interventions, either by attending workshops or by “apprenticing” to someone trained in this technique. We should be clear that conducting an intervention is not something you do on the spur of the moment. It is not something to be done impromptu, just because you happen to have the family together. Nor is it something you describe to the family and suggest they do on their own after supper some evening!The effectiveness of intervention depends on the participants’ ability to voice a genuine concern and describe incidents that have caused concern in an objective, straightforward manner. This takes briefing and preparatory work. Typically, this will entail several meetings with the family. The family members must become knowledgeable about the disease of alcoholism, so that the behaviors that previously were seen as designed to “get them” can be seen for what they are, symptoms. The preparation will usually involve a rehearsal during which each of the participants goes through the things that they would like to convey to the alcoholic. The participants also need to discuss what treatment options are to be presented, and the actions they will take if the alcoholic does not seek help. Is the spouse ready to ask for a separation? Is the grown daughter ready to say she will not be comfortable allowing Mom to babysit for the grandchildren anymore. Beyond preparing the participants, a successful intervention also requires that the counselor be supportive to all present, equally, and deflect the alcoholic’s anxiety and fears, which may surface as anger.*128\331\2*

PROPHYLACTIC MEDICATIONS FOR ALLERGIC NOSES: CROMOLYN SODIUM NASAL SPRAY
Cromolyn sodium, manufactured by Fisons Corporation and available in the United States as Nasalcrom Nasal Solution since the early 1970s, was the first allergy prophylactic medication developed and marketed worldwide. A prophylactic medication is defined as one that acts as a preventative against disease. Cromolyn sodium functions as a prophylactic medication because it prevents the allergic process from developing. No process, no symptoms. This is in contrast to the other medications for allergic rhinitis-antihistamines, decongestants, corticosteroids, and ipratropium bromide – which act to relieve the symptoms, caused by the allergic process, but do not alter the process itself.
Since the early ’70s, much has been learned about this remarkable medication. Its list of actions currently includes the following:
- Preventing the release of mediators from mast cells
- Preventing the accumulation of inflammatory cells in the lining of the nose
- Blocking both early and late allergic reactions
- Inhibiting the action of cells that cause inflammation
It is the chemical mediators released during allergic reactions that cause the persistent inflammation characteristic of chronic rhinitis. Because of its ability to prevent the release of these chemicals into the nasal tissue, cromolyn sodium is widely prescribed by physicians as an allergy “blocking” drug. Of note is that cromolyn sodium is not an antihistamine, a decongestant, or a steroid.
*49/322/5*

PROPHYLACTIC MEDICATIONS FOR ALLERGIC NOSES: CROMOLYN SODIUM NASAL SPRAYCromolyn sodium, manufactured by Fisons Corporation and available in the United States as Nasalcrom Nasal Solution since the early 1970s, was the first allergy prophylactic medication developed and marketed worldwide. A prophylactic medication is defined as one that acts as a preventative against disease. Cromolyn sodium functions as a prophylactic medication because it prevents the allergic process from developing. No process, no symptoms. This is in contrast to the other medications for allergic rhinitis-antihistamines, decongestants, corticosteroids, and ipratropium bromide – which act to relieve the symptoms, caused by the allergic process, but do not alter the process itself.Since the early ’70s, much has been learned about this remarkable medication. Its list of actions currently includes the following:- Preventing the release of mediators from mast cells- Preventing the accumulation of inflammatory cells in the lining of the nose- Blocking both early and late allergic reactions- Inhibiting the action of cells that cause inflammationIt is the chemical mediators released during allergic reactions that cause the persistent inflammation characteristic of chronic rhinitis. Because of its ability to prevent the release of these chemicals into the nasal tissue, cromolyn sodium is widely prescribed by physicians as an allergy “blocking” drug. Of note is that cromolyn sodium is not an antihistamine, a decongestant, or a steroid.*49/322/5*

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